20170317
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My Traffic Estimate


  1. Quebec acted first (funded by the federal government) and in 1883 established a bizarre transportation system up the Ottawa River from Mattawa. (this shows on the 1908 map below (rapids, boats, portages, railway and ship) in blue on and along the Ottawa River

    click for pdf
    which consisted of
    • 3 steam boats on still waters between rapids
    • 3 portages
        all over a mile long. Passengers had to unload luggage, load it on a tramway, walk behind that tramway and then unload it and reload in onto the boat. The flies must have drove them crazy.
    • The fourth river steam boat took them from the head of the 3rd portage (Montagne rapids) up to the head of Seven League Lake and food of the Long Sault Rapids.
    • Due to the steepness of both banks the berth for this boat was 13 kilometres upstream from the Montagne rapid and 18 kilometres from the foot of the Long Sault rapids. This was known as the the foot of Seven League Lake which was - a narrowing of the Ottawa river less that 200 metres and it the only decent approaches for roads or trails on either bank of the river along with relatively still water.
  2. Beginning about 1840 this had a ferry for waggons in the summer and an ice bridge for sleighs in the winter to service the many lumber camps on the Quebec side. There was a road and crossing at the head of the L'Erables rapids but only in the summer time and that moving water seldom froze!
  3. This last part of the journey up to Lake Temiskaming was a 10 kilometre nightmare boulder strewn portage around the six turbulent miles of the Long Sault Rapids! However in 1886 that was changed to a narrow gauge steam locomotive with 3 flat cars and a passenger caboose on rails going around that white water. This journey ended at Lake Temiskaming where steam ships that would take them to their destinations of the arable farmlands of the Clay Plains up to 150 kilometres and the head of that lake.

  4. Ontario owned half of the Ottawa River and Lake Temiskaming and
      there wasn't any other route to bring settlers into Northern Ontario.
      • In 1885 Ontario finally realized that they already had a good winter road a first nation's trail for several thousand years used by the lumbermen since the 1830s. That traffic made a great passageway for draught animals and sleighs in the winter.
      • Ontario had to upgrade this ready made road to Colonization Road Standards allowing waggons and other types of wheeled transportation!
      • The image below shows this roads approximate location and the red box in it showing a 1939-1945 air photo composite which gives a clear view of the terminus of this 1885 road at the foot of Seven League Lake.


        passengers, luggage and cargo) could board the steam boat berthed at the foot of Seven League Lake. This eliminated 3 boats and 3 portages and drudgery of unloading, carrying luggage, and then loading on the next boat again and again and again. Those steam boats and the narrow gauge railway were under the Quebec Oblate Order's control but because public (federal) money was spent on these they could not refuse paying customers.

    This was the first transportation route used to settle Northern Ontario and likely the oldest Highway north of the Mattawa and French river that is still in existence today!

  5. This is a link to clippings of the Ontario Sessional Papers from 1880 through to 1913 which are legal proof of this roads existence and the fact that public monies were expended on this Colonization Road. This road continued to be used and maintained for the next 63 years.

  6. Between 1948 - 1952 the H.E.P.C. (Ontario Hydro Electric Power Commission) built the the Otto Holden Station aside from the dam there was lots to do upstream from it.
    • mitigation of 2 colonization roads for drowning parts of them under MNR's Water Power Lease #25!
    • plus a 45 kilometre diversion of the, to be drowned CPR railway, through very rugged terrain through granite hills
    • there were no roads in Quebec that went to this construction other than that old lumber road which crossed the narrows at the foot of Seven League Lake.
    • The CPR spur line had to kept in regular service before the flooding.
    • Duquette Club - Wabe Maquaw (shown below) was going to be drowned so it had to be purchased - this 8 hectare flat area was half way through this CPR diversion (there were no other roads to this) so it it was also a logical place to establish headquarters of that 4 year project.
    • following is a clipping of the Quebec Legal Survey Map that shows this area

    • The 1885 Colonization Road had to be upgraded to handle the heavy traffic that suddenly came on it for this project
    • and sometime during this project they would have to mitigate (under MNR's Water Power Lease #25 - North Bay registry) for the drowning of this 1885 road and it's landing
        by building a new replacement landing (road, parking lot and dock) O.7 km downstream (i.e. at the current location of what is now Coxeys Landing Road.)
    Once again public monies have been expended on the 1885 Mattawa and Temiscamingue Colonization Road.

  7. In 1956 Sec Hwy 553 came into being essentially this was a name change of the Mattawa and Temiscamingue Colonization Road.
    • This seem to stop just past Crooked Lake and rest of that road, to the new landing on Lac La Cave, was termed a Development Road.
        Somewhere in this period #4 John Coxey acquired the Duquette Fish and Game Club lease and it's assets. Moving the cottages to the new Quebec landing and dock across the River from the new Ontario terminus/landing of the Mattawa and Temiscamningue Colonization Road. He ran that as a tourist camp for a number of years and then changed it to a club with local residents (at least, my father became a member and bought a cottage on that land circa 1974, shortly after Secondary Highway 533 was paved.)

  8. In 1958 the DHO (Department of Highways) decided to extend Secondary Highway 533 to Highway 63
    • Under History of this article above it says "
    • By 1958 the route was extended north to Highway 63.[7]
    • In 1962, work began on paving the gravel sections of the highway.[8]
    • Construction was completed by 1973,[9]
    • This was done by Day Labour ao Department Highways Ontario (DHO) was primary contractor
    • the starting location was within 50 metres of Timber Creek crossing of that 1885 colonization road which is part of an esker meaning exceptionally good borrow and gravel
    • so the DHO greatly improved a "grass roots" lumber road to bring that material up for the construction of the 533 extension.
    This was the first project that I worked on in my 35 tenure with the MTO.


Conclusion: Public monies have been expended on the current Coxeys Landing Road from Sec. Hwy 533 north 2.57 kilometres to the Landing (parking lot, boat launch and dock) at the Ottawa River meaning this road should be a SHARED by the MNR policies or a COMMON road by the MTO.


click for a pdf
COXEYS LANDING ROAD IS AN ACCESS ROAD (highway and/0r common road) AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC HAS THE RIGHT TO FREELY ACCESS IT AND THE LANDING ON THE OTTAWA RIVER and while in there, have decent EMS SUPPORT AS WELL!.

THE MNR'S NORTH BAY DISTRICT OFFICE SEEMS TO HAVE REFUSED TO DO OR SHOW A "USE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY" ON COXEYS LANDING ROAD WHICH IF DONE PROPERLY WILL RESULT IN THIS ROAD'S STATUS CHANGED TO A "SHARED ROAD"

PERHAPS COXEYS LANDING ROAD SHOULD COME UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION or MINISTRY OF NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT AND MINES under the LOCAL ROADS BOARD ACT! Thank you for reading this - I am hoping you can help!

If you have queries or comments I would be happy to accomodate.

Roy Summers
121 Timmins St., North Bay, ON P1B 4K2
705.474.4795
roysummers121@gmail.com